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-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> senator mark pryor is joining us this week on "the communicators." your full committee recently approved tom wheeler to the sec. senator cruz,, has talked about putting a hold on that nomination. any word on that right now? >> we are working on that. the may 1 say, thank you for having me on. people in arkansas to watch c- span lot, i want to thank c-span for what they do. back to the tom wheeler nomination, basically there is sentiment within the senate that we ought to repair this with the republican nominee. have acans would like to republican to go alongside the process. the problem is the we have not thecially released republican name that they want nominated. hopefully we will get this done quickly and senator rockefeller has said this publicly that he wanted to expedite that. my view is that you do not have to pare them. it ink that if we can do such a way that it does not , it will beme protracted and i would go ahead to try to get tom wheeler on. >> one of the co
and other opportunities that we're all hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. so recent studies have shown that throughout the united states, but also in iowa, that all growth in work force in the next 30 years will be attributable to immigrants, because of this demographic of retiring baby boomers and the generation coming after them. and of course also as i think senator harkin alluded to, we also need to not only fill jobs that are are currently here, but we need to create jobs, we need known vagues. and this is where immigrants have really contributed to america as well. immigrants are are more likely as a group to start businesses. immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they are working in the high tech industries and that, than native born counterparts. then finally we have to remember that we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from the rest of the world. and that's true for our economy. so therefore our economy is not a zero sum game, our work force is not a zero sum game. businesses and workers adapt to changing policies and changing circumstances.
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis -- >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviolent coordinating committee, and he was 23 years ol
, and this is "your money." are we one america with two economies? america is the land of opportunity, right? >> you can choose policies that invest in our middle class and create new jobs and grow this economy so that everybody has a chance to succeed. >> that was 2008. four and a half years later, the president's supporters are wishing for a little less hope and a little more change. >> doing nothing doesn't help the middle class. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the compan
opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
and major company are celebrating big sales. that's good for america. where is the investment in american workers? we're just going to let an entire city just go off into the dust. because some democrats were in charge of pension plans and fair wages in america. but now it is the big banks. they are now asking the judge for first dibs on the city's tax dollars. residents stage a protest on 48. i don't think they'll give up. but apparently the banks want to fick bones claen before detroit can even get back on its feet. >> we say take it from the banks. the banks destroyed detroit. they trapped detroit into high interest loans. now they're demanding first lien on all tax dollars. we're saying hell no. >> so they want first in. the big banks. your tax dollars went to save the financial sector in this country. will your tax dollars go to float a loan to the people of detroit to rebuild their communities? hell no. big banks are the real parasites of detroit. and the people are the victims in this. union busting is the really parasite. conservative policies which help businesses out for years.
bombing bow- toy business. you will want to meet mo. america's news headquarters starts right now. hello, everybody. we begin with what has everyone talking this woke week. a global warning from the state department. two dozen consulates will be closed tomorrow because of a massive terrorist threat. some are questions about the timing and how the administration is handling this. molly is joining us live. >> president obama we are learning was briefed on the potential al-qaeda terrorist threat and there is two prongs of how the obama administration is handling the terror attack. warning all americans about international travel spectacularly in the midoast and north africa. and two embassies and consulates will close as a precaution. tomorrow is also president obama's birthday and the now president of iowa ran is supposed to be worn in. before the president left to play golf he got an update and he will get additional updates throughout the woke week. the embassies and consulates that will close will stretch from eastern africa to bangladesh. the u.s. picked up increased chatter that a ter
. >> part time america, job growth slows, hourly earnings shrink. part time positions rise. what is behind the trends and what do they mean for the fed and your money? >>> frozen out. not even the rise in part time jobs is helping teenagers much. they can't find work and that is putting pressure on retailers. >> and know your options, when insurance won't cover your long-term care needs, what are the alternatives? we'll tackle that as we wrap up the series how to navigate long-term care. that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for friday august 2nd. >>> good evening everyone. american businesses weren't hiring much in july. it was supported to show 183,000 new jobs were added. it didn't. only 162,000 people got jobs, the slowest month since march. the numbers for may and june were revised down. hampton pearson takes a closer look behind the numbers. the reason why the jobless rate is lower and the troubling trends in the market. >>> economiests say factors with employers adding just 162,000 workers to payroll and a downward division of 26,000 jobs from the g
jobs overseas. >> the complaint is that we don't have jobs here in america. but the fact is labor is cheaper overseas. and youth unemployment here. minimum wage jobs in mcdonalds and entrow level position are necessary for high school and college students to get a to the in the work force. if you start raising that cost and making them more expensive, employees will not hiring then. there is a 17 percent youth unemployment rate. we'll see it go up. >> hold on, ju know. in your city alone, there is a walmart law where they want to increase the wage for walmart. there is a 34 percent unemployment rate in teens in washington d.c. and you box them outine more from jobs they need. >> wait a second, if you are talking about mcdonald, the average worker is 28. not teenagers. and second eric you and wayne will have to get in corporate jets to go to mcdonald and send those jobs overseas. that's what wayne is saying. >> no, let's be honest here. one more thing eric, you want us to bring third world wages. >> what are you talking about. >> my corporate jet was built overseas. >> there we go.
is always, we don't have any jobs here in america. the fact is the labor is cheaper overseas due to things like this with low skilled positions. let's talk about youth unemployment. minimum wage jobs, mcdonald's entry level positions are necessary for high school and college students to kind of get their way through school and get their foot into a work force. you started raising that costs and making them more expensive, employers are just going to stop hiring them. we have seen 17% youth unemployment rate we've seen it go up. >> eric: in your city alone they are trying to get a walmart they wanted to increase wage requirement. there is 34% unemployment rate in washington, d.c. you are going to box them out from jobs. >> wait a second. you have to consider if you are talking about mcdonald's. average age is 28. we're not talking about teenagers. second thing eric, you and waiteders going to have to get in corporate jets to get the mcdonald's hamburger that you think somehow, we're going to send those jobs overseas. that is what wayne is saying. let me tell you one more thing, one more for
address. >> racism in america. for it to be so blat abbott. >> that's right. jay-z, america is blatantly racist. that's why you're a multimillionaire. >> policy wise, zilch, zero, nada. >> i don't want to go through the same old arguments where i propose an idea and the republicans say no because it is my idea. 40 meaningless votes to repeal obamacare is not a jobs plan. >> who do you want to die in america with breast cancer? >> it is an aimless congress. >> the country is hanging by a thread here. >> we begin with a look at the ongoing right wing vitriol that has been spewed in what should be an opportunity for a sincere conversation about racism in america. the three top agents of intolerance, bill o'reilly, sean hannity and rush limbaugh continue to oopinion about the virtues. offering insulting diagnoses from crime to teen pregnancy to race. o'reilly went so far to say jay-z' wealth is evidence that america is post racial. he even took it upon himself to explain black culture to the naacp's senior vice president. we here thought their rhetoric should be called out for what it really
to this week in the americas. the u.s. army private bradley man in, what impact did the whistle blower have on america abroad? and negotiating with the colombian rebel group. and the villagers that take on the drug cartels. but first, viewed as a hero by some and a traitor by others, a soldier who blew the whistle on america's military and diplomatic secrets, found guilty of espionage and theft charges, but acquitted of aiding the enemy. >> when carrying out the air raid on baghdad in 2007, these pilots could not have imagined the video would one day be made public. the footage showing the killing of journalists and several other civilians sparking controversy. this is among the data and over by bradley manning and he has been convicted for it. they released a series of top- secret documents just as damaging. hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables. >> the battlefield consequences are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, allies, partners, and they will damage our relationships in debt -- a reputation in that part of the world. >> it is clear enemies of the u.s. will take care
in america. how do he get the conversation from the immigrant conversation without u out of fear to one of hope and about why we're the encounter country in the world. how do we get that conversation reignited here with our folks. i'm proud to be an american and we'll always celebrate the opportunity in this country. so from a senate side we're not going to have family - for many others when we became successful i wanted to share that with our family members. we've also been strong in family where's that tradition. so i want to go back to let's not have immigration reform based on fear but being the open light to the rest of the world. and with the attitude and spirit then you start saying what makes our country successful. it will not discriminate against gaze and lesbians. we can do more in our immigration policies. this is an opportunity in the celebration of our country let's not make decisions out of fear but out of a progressive approach. so we can have the talent and the values of what we believe in to be reflected in a good inhabitation policy >> let's hear from so many of the
a dynamic work force. they want everybody part-time. it's not just america and it's not bad thing. first of all in england where they have national health care, the government pays for health caring they have a record number of part-time workers. that's not because of obama care. what's really going on is employers don't want to necessarily hire you. they don't want to give you 401(k) or health benefits. yeah, that will discourage an pler to be a full-time. you guys are acting like the '50s model, the watch, the plan, health care. >> gary, take it on. >> i agree with jonas. we do want more flexibility but i'm sorry. he ee wrong about this being a trend for the last 40, 50 years. as i pointed out, in every economy, part-time jobs outnumber full-time jobs. fast food, movies, local government, you want to have part-time people there, they know the business, all the reasons they hire full-time. they see it growing economy. instead we're slapped with this new cost, the tax, call it what you will with obama care and companies want to be more flexible and they have to be by hiring part-time wor
, and author of the award winning wait until the midnight hour, black america, and bright lights from barack obama. our third scheduled speaker is kendall thomas who is travelingy has not yet arrived but we are hoping he will take the stage as soon as he does come. i will introduce him in his absence right now. he is nash professor of law and co-founder and director of the center for the study of law and culture at columbia university and professor thomas is one of the editors of the seminole volume critical race theory, the form of the movement. the three powerful thinkers and visionary speakers. [applause] >> get settled, and make yourself comfortable and we are so glad you made it. i was saying to camille and sarah before we came on that in so many ways barack obama has set up our conversation about blacks in the twenty-first century through his comments yesterday but i want to put that in the larger context because we are trying to take the backward and forward look on this panel in our conversation. the backward look is about where have we come, where have we come to since in the 50 yea
when you come right down to it, the united states of america's population is not going to buy into these stories that he spins out about the violation of a constitution. christie is there to tell you buildings were burning in new york. people were jumping out of windows. we have to protect ourselves. >> and growing opposition to the surveillance the nsa. rand paul is tapping some public sentiment. not just on the left. we had a vote in congress. a republican congress from michigan sponsoring an amendment that almost gutted the nsa collection of meta data. it failed 217-205. very close. so is dorothy right about the politics? >> i really would like to think dorothy's right about this and i'd like to think chris christie is right. i worry a little bit that 9/11, all of that, is becoming a new york/new jersey/connecticut thing. those of us who experienced it that day. and it is essentially receding out perhaps in parts of the country and becoming something of a distraction. because the united states has been lucky, unlike capitals in europe, not to experience another terrorist ev
children, as well. >> america's motor city working to start up for recovery. detroit becomes the largest city in the country to file for bankruptcy in u.s. history. this after a steady drop in population and decline in tax base for the past several decades. now the city is sitting on $18.5 billion in debt. >> one of the things that i want to say to our citizens is that as tough as this is, i really didn't want to go in this direction, but now that we are here, we have to make the best of it. >> detroit's murder rate is also at a 40-year high, and the population is at a low of 700,000. pope francis makes his first trip overseas since becoming pontiff, presiding over world youth day in rio de janeiro, bringing in millions of young catholics from around the world to attend the event that happens every two years. the pope, who has spoken often of concerns for the poor, will tour a shanty neighborhood and speak to business and political leaders. for "teen kids news," i'm laura ingle, "fox news channel in the classroom." >> imagine trying to find your way in a new country when both the languag
on family and race in america, and her return to acting. get ready for an oprah like never before. >>> good evening to you on this friday night. as we all head into this weekend together, another reminder of this uncertain world. there is a worldwide alert that al qaeda is looking for a moment to strike. today the state department issuing an alert warning americans overseas, that a plot is under way. but are there specific targets, and what should americans do? abc's chief global affairs correspondent, martha raddatz, tracking all the latest developments for us tonight. martha? >> today's global travel alert comes as the state department is preparing to shut down more than 20 embassies and consulates, the most to be closed since 9/11. a terrible reminder for americans that we are still major targets. the worldwide warning is alarming and unusually broad. it covers travel for americans across the globe and cautions travelers to be especially wary of tourist sites and public transportation. also unusual, the warning will stay in effect until the end of august. terrorists may use a variety of
taxes. democrats want to give them more power? they want this agency involved in america's healthcare? no way. watchdogagency's own says the irs can't handle the job. , the inspector general stated they are not 'snfident about the irs ability to protect confidential information or protect fraud. neither am i. by any indication, neither are the american people. it has been three years since the healthcare law was passed. in less than two months, the administration claims it will be ready to implement the law. in the face of all these , more americans than ever want this law to be repealed. it is simple. increased healthcare costs to families and individuals. it has stifled individuals from expanding. it has forced job creators to cut hours. just yesterday, a key official could not confirm that the healthcare law was lowered in my home state of michigan. wasn't this the signature propolis -- promise of this administration? premiums would be lower. the administration cannot make good on that promise. with so little time before , it ises are set to open extremely concerning that the admin
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with their families. but at the time the direction connect to the history of the city being a city of immigrants 35 percent of all the small businesses in san francisco was owned by an immigrant. our whole history this city's been built on good immigrants who found ideas and employed others. and today that story has not changed. i think that the businesses in succeed if we have good sound business policies but we make sure there's comprehensive immigration reform. because we've he learned over the years is that there are millions of people in the state of california and undocumented folks in san francisco that are not part of our official economy that are hiding. becau
provided an area that is important. and the context of sea level rise after the america's cup is complete. in terms of overall lessons those are lessons of the plan 127b9d public engagement and it's going to last throughout the project. we've learned that the public expects excellence on the waterfront xylophones. our partners are selected through a fair public ocess. that b cdc have to be an integral part of this process. and especially, when you're looking at major industries like at pier 70 it's important. the public is increasingly enjoying the project. and we've learned that the design uses can connect the neighborhoods to the waterfront. neck steps we're working together with those promotions and there's a high number of them at the same time. we're trying to implement the land use plan and the other neighborhoods plan. to meet the goals we're looking at potential zoning changes and probably tweaks to the waterfront designing pr we think that some of those changes are likely justified and those sites play an important part in reaching our targets. we still doesn't add up to all the
. the other thing is that it has been 50 years since the crest of the movement, and america still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that. there are still many people hiding from the great benefits of the 1960's, so i wanted to do something to crystallize that. the lessons from the people in the civil rights era. tavis: what lessons do you think that the american public, by and large, as we approach the anniversary -- we will talk about that in a moment -- what do they still seem blind to? >> george wallace pledged segregation forever. this country was segregated. all through the south, in the constitutions of the southern states, there was not a single public official that advocated the end of segregation. now, that is gone. and not only has that benefited african-american citizens to the point that we have one now in the white house, but it has benefited women, the disabled, senior citizens, and even, of course, the white south, when it was invested in segregation, it was the poorest region in the country. you had never heard of the sun belt, and it has benefited tre
a couple. the main strooechl media holds the sway. most tv networks in america get their talking points from the new york times. that's one of the problem with this story. it's hard to pick up steam when the establishment won't go after the president over something that's really sleazy. i mean this smells really bad whether you're a republican. suppose you're a republican and he does the same thing. you set the press department that this president can get away with it. other presidents can get away with it as well. >> julie, by the way, if you'll just pipe down. >> i'm biding my time. i'm waiting for you to get it out of your system. >> do you think the irs is indeed a scandal or the revelations that are coming to light? >> i think what happens is the irs is a scandal. i have no evidence that it reached the white house or barack obama or anybody in his inner circle told people to go do this. they're jumping to conclusions without any evidence. >> that's what reporters are supposed to do. >> let her in. >> you're right. you're right. and think fox news has done a very good job of looking
is the case against. >> only in america can our politicians bemoan a livable wage for getting alot of folks would be grateful for any wage. >> people are not in poverty because they are making minimum wage. >> what we are talking about is rewarding mediocrity. >> the first step on the lad certificate not to be comfortable. you're not supposed to be hanging out there. so you double the salary, you turn that rung into a hammock. >> exactly. you remove the incentive. if you raise the minimum wage, people will never stop working in the fast-food industry. they'll get so comfortable in those hot kitchens and in their acrylic uniforms, relaxing in that grease fog selling like processed meat no matter how many showers they take. of course-- (cheers and applause) >> it's luxury. it's luxury. that's his point. kind of. of course he's also going to be business for the same stupid stuff on television industry. well, not some of an industry as a company. but when you think about it-- when you think about it, if you think abouting it, they actually work very much along the lines of the fast food busines
think he's thrilled with the opportunity to transform america and move it away from this unjust, immoral way it was founded. and make it fair for everybody. i mean, whatever he's trying to do to it. i do think he's possessed with that. whether he likes to get up and go to work every day, i don't think he likes having opposition. beneath him, he doesn't want to negotiate. wipe them out. put in the political things. just get rid of them. that's his modus operandi. >> i don't think he likes the process. mike dukakis did. >>> rush limbaugh has much more to say. he insists washington doesn't want to find ways to fraud. what does he mean by that? you have not heard this and you will straight from rush. >>> plus, you will find out the real reason why rush loves his job. our sit-down interview with rush limbaugh continues next. hey, it's me, progressive insurance. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with gre
to the hospital. twice as much, we and america spend twice as much as the health care system and we can do amazing things for people but i don't believe we are getting our money's where, $2.8 trillion, 18% of our economy. i can't get my head around the number that big. i know what that will buy and for 1% of that, you can buy five of me. there are only 15 primary care in camden and all getting boarded up. we have to reinvest the money on the front line of care rather than building more hospitals and expanding emergency rooms, and at incredibly high price if you cut in that and hospitalize and we set a lower price if you talk to people and the market has responded, if you look at every major city those cranes that are above buildings building new lanes and expanding hospitals, if you overpay you will get too much and if we get a bubble of hospital beds and technical capacity of specialists, and we will destroy the other part of the market. and decent primary-care. the most in expensive patients in camden have $3.5 million in receipts, go to 18% of patients and 90% of costs. we ignore 1% of patients
>>> good morning, america. this morning, an extraordinary global warning. the u.s. government warning americans traveling overseas about a possible al qaeda attack. u.s. embassies are shutting down. how can you stay safe? >>> also, a defiant a-rod speaking out. saying there's a lot more fight left in him. >> get back on the field. help me team win a championship. >> this as he faces a suspension or possibly lifetime ban from baseball. his revealings words after last night's game. >>> caught on camera. she came home from iraq a hero. and then became an all-american nfl cheerleader. now, she's wrapped up in a very ugly domestic violence case. and wait until you hear who police say the victim is. >>> and designer dessert. is it a fruit or candy? we'll tell you what candy flavor these grapes are mimicking. the crazy creation of a fruit breeder. and he tells us how he did it. >>> good morning, everybody. lots to talk about this morning, including a bizarre twist in the case of this brazen jailbreak you're looking at right now. the inmate getting away while surveillance cameras roll
where i am. i'll be honest. a lot of people are saying it's america's weakness. we're showing that we're afraid of al-qaeda, we're closing ems basies. on the other hand, god forbid and something happened and we weren't prepared and didn't vacate some people and heard peo these threats, there would a lot of us saying we should have closed these embassies. however, we have fast responsess teams in spain, bahrain, italy, and have the marine expeditionary unit in the middle east ready to go. this is clearly -- the size and scope of it, 21 embassies and four consulates, 21 total. the scope of the cell tells you there is a credible threat. there is going to be something they believe in nature is credible. maybe it wasn't such a bad idea to close some of these. >> it does, andrea, seem overbroad. however, maybe they have reason to because they have enough chatter to know there is something going on.er and perhaps it's a way to drawog out terrorists and figure out a way to track down and pinpoint who it might be that's trying to perpetrate this. >> i hope that's it. i think it's either probab
's happening in the part of the world where america and our allies are often hated. tonight we know more about what could lie ahead as changes are being made to protect our own. >>> also an appeal to stop the early release of 10,000 prisoners denied. one state is forced to let the inmates go free because of overcrowding. fox report, the number one concern now is publicovercrowdi. fox reports the number one concern now is public safety. and, coming to america from spain, the great bull run. you don't have to head overseas for this adrenaline rush. >>> america on high alert as the sun rises on a sunday on the other side of the world. several of our conflicts and embassies, the face of america in a foreign country will remain concerned about a threat that is real. in countries like yemen, jordan and egypt. beefing up additional security with troops and check points in the hopes of deterring any attacks. all told more than 2,000 embassies will remain closed as of today, sunday, in that part of the world. the state department also issuing a global travel alert to any american traveling overseas, wa
in america. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. >> thanks for watching us. new revelations about the benghazi attack. that's the subject of this evening's talking points memo. so fox news has learned. >> now some are being swim intimidated into staying silent. the officers have been forced to take lie detector tests to persuade them about what really went on that night. pretty odd, my opinion, the wrong people are getting the polygraphs. why not susan rice or hillary clinton, or the president himself. >> that's the memo, now for the top story. two different views on this. fox news's military analyst, author of the big new book, terror red. now before we talk about the cia, i want to address these emkbasz e embassy closings. . why do we tell everything about it. >> first of all, we get threats every day. on the hour where these embassies are now being closed. what's happening and this one is our agency's intelligence community, in collaboration with -- what we have done, though, is extend the ban on travel until the end of the month. so there
as an invasion decades in the making under way in avian species staking claim to the americas, but creatures that will die rather than in retreat. >> title date we will stop the spread of the african es. >> moving through florida headed for georgia. killer bees now number more than 1 trillion and will soon be headed your way. john: whatht are we going to do? let's ask this man who is on the animal planet show the removal specialists, a mike mollica burger should we be scared of the killer bees? >> iould not be any more afraid tn being struck by lightning. john: but they are investing in moving north? >> when they were released fromrazil in 1957 they spread at a rate to 300 miles per year. hn: and experimental went wrong? >> they were taken from africa and brought to brazil to create a better be to more resistant to the pathogens a create better honey and it was an accidental release from one of the assistance that allowed these into the of wiwild where they spread rapidly nooth in six states right now. john: there more dangerous because they don't is -- get discouraged and will chase you fur
to transform america and move it away from this unjust, immoral way it was founded. and make it fair for everybody. i mean, whatever he's trying to do. i do think he's probably obsessed and very absorbed with that. whether he likes getting up and going to work every day and dealing -- i don't think he likes having opposition. i think it's beneath him. he doesn't want to negotiate. wipe them out. put it in the political sense. just get rid of them. that's his modus operandi. so i don't think he likes the process like dukakis did. >> straight ahead, rush limbaugh has much more to say. he insists washington doesn't want to find waste and fraud. what does he mean by that? you've not heard this and you will straight from rush. >> plus you will find out the real reason why rush loves his job. our sitdown interview with rush limbaugh continues next. check out the bass pro shops' fall hunting classic. where you can save up to $100 on top of already low sale prices during our bow and crossbow trade-in sale. plus, additional instant savings on select gear when you pay using your bass pro shops
formed in washington. mary peters who is here at us today has an very much an advocate of america's infrastructure alliance that ,as an funded by the airlines water transportation, put this together to form the alliance to advocate and put the american people. you do not understand the importance of the waterway system. making sure the american people understand that is important. it is a big effort. we're all going to need to pitch in and make sure we are involved in this for. an absolutely critical role in moving this agenda forward. congress needs to hear from you. i believe we can have success. we will be able to do what is necessary to keep this country in a competitive state. if you have places like brazil they want to drive down the .ost these are the kind that competitive situations that are occurring out there. they have signed a deal that they will not go through the panama canal. the world is getting smaller. we have to remain competitive. area.k this is a vital i appreciate the opportunity. thank you very much. [no audio] [applause] >> thank you very much. let's open u
have the trend in america where we bring the bettest and brightest from around the world, and we educate them and say thank you. >> we don't call them aliens but customers. america is such a large native market that adding more customers makes us better, more people to build things and invent things and people to actually man the factories and it's particularly stupid, sorry, particularly stupid for the american government to require us to fully educate people with phd's, and ship them out of the country and take american jobs away. >> you have to keep people with great skills and great educations that can start businesses here and you have to do a better job making sure you are raising people with those skills, and we are not doing both of those things. >> the easiest thing to do now is to keep the high-tech people in america so they don't create competitors in other countries and they create jobs and corporations here, and they can do that in a second and it chanjust takes a change in law. >> we have a phone that will be always on, and google, which basically maybe knows what i
like you and me, and they got a helping hand from youth service america, y.s.a. >> y.s.a. is a global nonprofit that reaches out to young people around the world, now in over 106 countries, and asks them to change the world. >> i help the senior citizens locally through a charity. >> i'm an adviser for prep for prep on saturdays, which is this program that helps low-income kids get into independent schools. >> i'm going to nicaragua to build for a community. >> i definitely want to start a charity for people and children in the world who don't have everything that we have, but i don't really know how to. >> we often report on service projects kids are doing. that's how we found out about y.s.a. it helps great ideas find support and funding. according to y.s.a., there are four ways kids can change the world. >> the first is through awareness, where they raise awareness about big issues. second thing is service, where they intervene. they provide their time and their talents to a big problem. third is through advocacy, where they might do letters to the editors, have their voices heard.
can't burn it in america, put it on a train, ship it over to china or india. so, we got market forces. and against that we have to marshal intelligence and collaboration and political response, because this stuff is serious. and the fact that people aren't worried about it and don't talk about it doesn't mean it isn't serious. and that's the insidious character of this -- of this challenge, that some people know about it, 90, 97% of the scientists who deal in climate science all agree that when it comes to doing something it takes leadership. and not just political leadership, but business leadership, church leadership, academic leadership. and that's the context, i believe, in which you have come together. you're focusing on solar energy. that's a big piece. there's plenty of sun out there to take care of our energy. it's going to take time. it's going to take technology. it's going to take scientific breakthroughs, research, and development. and it's going to take storage. and it's going to take various insebastianvv stifle. just in california you have some cities that charge 1800 b
to hire people. >> this is good for your business. >> it's good for our business, but not good for america. and that's the important thing, are we for interested in our business or america. i'm more interested in america than i am in our own business. 94% of all the companies over 50 employees had health insurance. there's only 6% of them that was going to affect anybody. we have health insurance in our company for every temporary associate. >> i worked for manpower once, i needed a job for a short period. they gave me a sickle, they said see that grass? go cut it. >> we have 80,000 employees a day. >> let me take a break, i promise we'll get to everybody. and the campaign to derail obama care has now taken over the air waive waves. we'll get reaction from our studio audience. we want to get -- follow the show, share your thoughtses on obama care or you can join us on twitter at sean hannity. ♪ [ male announcer ] over the last 100 years, tennis has gotten a lot less dainty, rackets less splintery, courts more surfacey. technology made the game a whole lot faster and awesomer. it's kind o
african american to pursue a job. >> tackling the race issue in america. bill's interview with the founder of black entertainment television, robert johnson. the factor begins right now. >> hi, i'm greg gut feld in for bill o'reilly. thanks for joining us. new revelations about the benghazi attack. fox news learned at least five cia employees were forced to sign extra non-disclosure agreements following the attack aimed at preventing leaks i guess. cnn reported dozens of cia personnel were in benghazi and now some are being intimidated into staying silent reportedly forced to have lie detector tests as a way to persuade them from saying about what happened that awful night. my opinion, the wrong people are getting the polygraphs why not susan rice? hillary clinton? or the president himself? i only would have one question, who pushed the video? that is it. because underneath the phony denials and blame and cover up, it's one missing truth. why was america told that antiislam video was blamed for a spontaneous attack that wasn't spontaneous at all? we know the answer. a planned terrorist att
and now more and more in america. i turn not soft liberalism. to that is what we are really going to focus on today. in order to understand, we are going to have to do a history of liberalism. and if there is a history, it's a bigger leukine for history that we need to sort out the confusion that we find. at least the start. it's important to try to provide a clear understanding of what liberalism is in its essence. i trace it back 500 years. not the 1950s, the 500 years. to the founder of modern liberalism. so we need to do a lot of history to understand this at its roots. when we look at this, what we find is a dual movement that defines what liberalism really has been over the centuries in one form or another. simultaneously a rejection of christianity because it occurs within a christian context and an embracing of this world is the highest good. this material good as our ultimate and only home. liberals today are the intellectual heirs of this twofold desire for freedom. of course, you all know latin, so you know that this means free in latin. this is also the root word in liberalism
america. nearly 500 ships would travel these waters every year, carrying coal to the other side of the pacific. asia consumes more coal than rest of the world combined. in the next three years, countries there are expected to double the amount of coal they import today. that soaring demand spells opportunity for u.s. companies, according to bob waters, director of business development for s.s.a. marine. our particular project, gateway pacific terminals, when built and fully operational at full capacity, would generate approximately $5.5 billion in foreign monies infused back into the u.s. economy. >> reporter: this possibility has placed the northwest in the middle of a controversial debate: should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? as the nation's economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? gillette, wyoming lies in the heart of the nations largest coal mining region. one out of every six people here works for the coal industry. people like phil dillinger. mining has provided a steady salar
of five nonfiction books including "gifted hands" and "america the beautiful," is live for three hours answering your questions from facebook, twitter, e-mail and by phone. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. next, peter carlson recalls the capture of journalists albert richardson and junius browne by confederate forces at the battle of vicksburg. the reporters were sent to multiple confederate prisons over 20 months until they escaped and made their way across the appalachians with the assistance of union sympathizers. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, david. i'm thrilled to be here at the national archives. to be back here, i should say. i've written three books, and i have researched all of them at the national archives. a place with buried treasures all over it. they've got a lot of boxes here, boxes filled with little folders filled with papers, and there are a lot of stories hidden b in those papers. in fact, if you get really quiet and you listen really closely, you just
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